Solo Exhibition at The Asia Society Texas Center, Form is Emptiness, Emptiness is Form

16 November 2019 – 29 March 2020

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Asia Society Texas Center features the exhibition Form is Emptiness, Emptiness is Form: Works by Miya Ando. Drawing on the important Buddhist text known as the Heart Sutra, artist Miya Ando responds to our unique building with references to elemental materials such as metal, light, water, and wood. This site-specific response to Yoshio Taniguchi's architecture reframes the visitor's perception of the space, and invites contemplation of the nature of reality.

The exhibition will also be accompanied by an Artist Talk on Saturday, November 16th at 1:15pm.
Join featured artist Miya Ando as she describes the inspiration she draws from the Buddhist text, the Heart Sutra, for this site-specific response to the unique architecture of Yoshio Taniguchi, captured in her new exhibition Form is Emptiness, Emptiness is Form. Ando will discuss her studio processes as they relate to working with elemental materials such as wood, metal, and light.

Links here with more information:
Exhibition page: https://asi.as/MiyaAndo
Artist Talk: https://asi.as/EuiuE3

Socrates Sculpture Park - Annual Benefit Gala Honoring Agnes Gund & Xaviera Simmons - Special Edition Made By Miya Ando

‘Four Seasons Mandalas (Under the Silver River) #4 Early Summer,’ 2019
Dyed Bodhi (Ficus Religiosa) leaves, pure silver thread, monofilament on ragboard
20 x 20 inches (24 x 24 inches framed)
Edition of 12 with 6 A.P.s
For price inquires please contact jw@socratessculpturepark.org

As a special limited benefit edition for Socrates Sculpture Park, artist Miya Ando has created a series of multi-hued mandalas out of bodhi leaves. Each edition is uniquely pigmented to reference the subtle yet distinct chromatic gradients of a ‘sub-season’ – the early, mid, or late part of a calendar season.

To create the mandalas, Ando bleached and dyed the leaves then used silver thread to stitch them together along their miniscule veinature – creating unique geometric patterns. Aligned at 90 degree rotations, the silver thread also suggests a compass and provides an anchor for wandering eyes.

Ando drew inspiration from aspects of Buddhism like The Buddha’s enlightenment under the bodhi tree, the belief that mandalas represent the universe, and their traditional use as meditation aids. ‘Four Seasons Mandala (Under the Silver River)’ also references Ando’s recent commission ‘銀河 Ginga (Silver River)‘ for Socrates’ summer 2019 exhibition ‘Chronos Cosmos: Deep Time, Open Space.’ A circuitous canopy of undulating chiffon suspended above the earth, ‘Silver River’ allowed viewers to look through the translucent fabric patterned with stars and see the sky beyond.

Ando’s mandalas adopt a similarly mesmerizing layering effect and relish in awe of natural phenomena. The way the rings of leaves are overlaid creates a pulsating visual effect that suggests the relational character of the universe and highlights our connection to and place within the natural world. In harmonization with her time working at Socrates, Ando has created this beautiful new meditation on how nature shapes our belief systems and our way of ordering the world.

Miya Ando is represented by Sundaram Tagore Gallery and has exhibited her work throughout the United States and internationally at various locations including the Noguchi Museum, Long Island City, NY; LACMA, Los Angeles, CA; Bronx Museum, Bronx, NY; and San Jose Art Museum, San Jose, CA, among others.

On View at the Detroit Institute of Arts, Robert & Katherine Jacobs Asian Wing Opening

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Photos Courtesy of the Detroit Institute of Arts

Photos Courtesy of the Detroit Institute of Arts

Works on view:
Kumo (Cloud) October 4.4.3, 2017, ink on aluminum composite, 48x48 inches
Kumo (Cloud) 49x3.17, 2017, ink on aluminum composite, 48x48 inches

Sun, Nov 4, 2018 — Mon, Sep 30, 2019
The DIA’s expanded Asian Galleries present works of art from the world’s largest continent, featuring recent acquisitions together with longtime DIA treasures coming back onto view. Joining the recently opened gallery for Japanese art are galleries dedicated to Chinese, Korean, and Indian and Southeast Asian art, and Buddhist art across Asia.

The gallery for Chinese art invites visitors to take part in a long tradition of active viewing, whether by immersing themselves in historical paintings or by leaving their mark on a digital handscroll. The gallery also features ancient Chinese objects for life and the afterlife.

The Korean gallery explores the dynamic relationship that many Korean works of art have to the ideal of harmony, highlighting both historical works and contemporary artists.

In the gallery for Indian and Southeast Asian art, visitors are invited to consider Hindu sculptures in their original contexts, where they connect believers to the infinite divine. Visitors will also see art of the Jain religion and Southeast Asian textiles. In another section, Indian paintings are displayed alongside a sound station, inviting visitors to explore how music impacts their emotional responses to visual art.

The works on display in the gallery for Buddhist art span centuries and were made for diverse Buddhist traditions across Asia. Uniting them is the idea that they support the path toward enlightenment, a core principal and goal of the Buddhist religion.

In the new Asian galleries, visitors will learn about many philosophies and systems of belief that have shaped arts and cultures across Asia. The presence of contemporary Asian art and modern technology in these spaces invites visitors to make meaningful connections to our world today.

 

*Exhibition dates reflect the dates for Arts of Asia: A Year-Long Celebration, a year of Asian programming coinciding with the opening of our new Asian galleries on November 4, 2018.

A RUBIN SOIREE - POWER AFTER DARK TUESDAY, 9.17.19 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM 

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Take part in an elegant and immersive Rubin Museum dinner soiree.

Engage with an extraordinary and diverse group of artists seated alongside you at an intimate dinner. This will be a night to enjoy delicious food and drink, and to connect deeply with art, artists, and one another, all in support of the Rubin.

Expect a night of art and artist encounters.

Black Tie / Festive attire

Lead Hosts:

Shelley and Donald Rubin

William E. Mayer

New York Life

Christopher J. Fussner

Agnes Gund

Eva and Yoel Haller

NEPC, LLC

Basha Frost Rubin and Scott Grinsell

Akhoury Foundation

Lois and Bob Baylis

Ann and Matt Nimetz

Tongtong Zhu


Honored and Featured Artists:

Lida Abdul

Miya Ando

Kader Attia

Molly Crabapple

E.V. Day

Milton Glaser

Nadia Kaabi-Linke

Naiza Khan

Kimsooja

Jill Magid

Pallavi Paul

Shahpour Pouyan

Kembra Pfahler

Parker Posey

Ibrahim Quraishi

Sara Raza

Shelter Serra

Nari Ward

Palden Weinreb

Hank Willis Thomas

Opening Lecture with Miya Ando, Marilyn Minter and Joachim Pissarro - Crystals in Art: Ancient to Today at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, October 11, 2019

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Join us for an opening discussion on the exhibition Crystals in Art: Ancient to Today, featuring artists Miya Ando and Marilyn Minter in conversation with curator Joachim Pissarro. Crystals in Art: Ancient to Today is the first exhibition of its kind to explore the complex and varied connections between crystal and art throughout the world, spanning history and geography. The conversation this evening will feature a special discussion around Minter and Ando’s work included in the exhibition, Crystal Swallow, 2006 (Minter) and Tides, 2011 (Ando). 

Marilyn Minter’s work vividly explores the complex and contradictory emotions around beauty and the female body in American culture, among other themes. Most often enamel on metal, the large-scale works capitalize on her photorealistic technique to critique the promise of perfection in fashion, exposing physical imperfections and the unabashed exploitation of women’s bodies as catalysts for consumerism. Using her fingers to soften and model the quick-drying enamel paint, Minter highlights the power and effect of these physical, material, and feminine talismans of beauty. Minter’s work has been featured in numerous group shows, most notably the 2006 Whitney Biennial, New York, which was hailed as her return to prominence. 

Miya Ando is an American artist known for her metal paintings which encapsulate both ephemerality and permanence in their subtle, brilliant color gradients. Working across two and three dimensions, Ando’s oeuvre contains abstract painting and sculpture, including large-scale public art pieces, that reflect the transitory essence of life. Blending the natural with the industrial, Ando utilizes the enduring materiality of metal with evanescent scenes of the environment. Her self-developed process of painting into the surface of the aluminum creates tranquil, mutable scenes of the atmosphere, while her glass sculptures capture cloud formations through infinitesimal fractures within. 

Joachim Pissarro is currently the Bershad Professor of Art History and Director of the Hunter College Galleries, Hunter College, CUNY/City University of New York. He was a Curator at MoMA’s Department of Painting and Sculpture. His teaching and writing presently focus on the challenges facing art history due to the unprecedented proliferation of art works, images, and visual data. He co-authored a book on this topic with David Carrier, entitled Wild Art. In the same vein, he also taught a seminar on Michael Jackson: The Contemporary Representation of a Cultural Icon.

Free with online registration, register online or with Guest Services.

LIMITED EDITION FOR SOCRATES SCULPTURE PARK'S 2019 ANNUAL BENEFIT GALA - OCTOBER 3RD, 2019

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ABOUT THE EVENT

Socrates Sculpture Park’s 2019 Benefit Gala

Honoring Agnes Gund & Xaviera Simmons

With a special benefit edition by Miya Ando

Thursday, October 3rd, 2019

Mark di Suvero’s Studio

Long Island City, Queens

6:30pm Cocktails & Dinner | 9:30pm Gala Ends

Socrates Sculpture Park is delighted to honor philanthropist Agnes Gund and artist Xaviera Simmons at the Park’s 2019 Annual Benefit Gala on Thursday, October 3, 2019. These two remarkable women reflect the Park’s mission to produce dynamic arts and cultural programming that is accessible to all.

The 2019 Gala will be hosted at Mark di Suvero’s magnificent waterfront studio in Long Island City where guests can mingle on the pier and enjoy boat excursions on the East River.

A special limited edition by artist Miya Ando will be available for purchase.

SUPPORT & PURCHASE TICKETS

The Annual Benefit Gala raises critical funds that directly support Socrates Sculpture Park and our mission to support artists and produce free cultural programming that serves more than 200,000 people annually.

To avoid a 3% processing fee paid for by the Park, please send your contribution form and check to our office. Checks should be made payable to SOCRATES SCULPTURE PARK and sent to:

2019 Gala Headquarters

Socrates Sculpture Park

PO Box 6259

Long Island City, NY 11106

Or you can support the gala and purchase tickets via our online form.

Questions? Contact gala@socratessculpturepark.org or 718-956-1819 x102

On view: Hong kong ben brown fine arts

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Elements of Transcendence

15 June – 31 August 2019

Ben Brown Fine Arts is thrilled to present a summer group exhibition, Elements of Transcendence, at the Hong Kong gallery. The exhibition brings together the work of four artists who explore spirituality through their artwork, employing various artistic techniques and practices, historical and autobiographical references, and imagery and symbolism ranging from abstraction to realism. The output of these four international artists, Miya Ando, Kitty Chou, Hyon Gyon and Lucy Liu, is informed by both Eastern and Western influences and experiences, resulting in a poignant and provocative conversation within the gallery walls.

Miya Ando

Ando explores the transformation of metals, wood and glass through varying techniques, from burnishing and charring to intermingling with elements such as silver nitrate, resin, gold and mica, producing subtle gradations of color and texture that suggest changing atmospheric conditions in nature. There is a duality to her wall pieces and sculptures – the foundation of metal and wood suggest permanence and solidity, while their altered surfaces are infused with the artist’s spiritual investigations and create a meditation on the ephemerality of the natural world.

Ando has had recent solo exhibitions at The Noguchi Museum, New York, and Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, Georgia, and her work is included in numerous public and private collections including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, Detroit Institute of Arts Museum, Detroit, Michigan; and Luft Museum, Amberg, Germany. Ando is a descendant of Bizen swordsmiths and spent part of her childhood among Buddhist priests at a temple in Okayama, Japan. Ando holds a bachelor’s degree in East Asian Studies from the University of California, Berkeley, studied East Asian Studies at Yale University and Stanford University, and apprenticed with a Master Metalsmith at Hattori Studio, Japan.

Kitty Chou

Chou’s enigmatic photographs are rooted in familiar subject matter– trees, doorways, bodies of water – yet through her lense they are transformed into the extraordinary, resulting in semi-abstract, ethereal, optical compositions that challenge perceptions of reality. Chou selected the three works in the exhibition as embodiments of her notions of Buddhist philosophy. Chou photographs her subjects with a simple digital camera and abstains from any form of staging in her creative process. Her images are the product of chance encounter, careful composition and captured moment.

Born and raised in Hong Kong, Kitty Chou holds bachelor’s degrees from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and the New York School of Interior Design. Her photographs have been exhibited in Hong Kong, London, Malta, New York, Paris and Taiwan. In 2013 and 2016 Chou was nominated for the Prix Pictet prize. Chou has had two solo exhibitions at Ben Brown Fine Arts Hong Kong and one solo exhibition at Ben Brown Fine Arts London.

Hyon Gyon

Hyon Gyon addresses highly charged and personal themes, such as shamanism, grief, catharsis, stigma, cultural identity and sexual politics, through her paintings, sculpture, installations and performances. The exhibition includes several portraits and still- lifes that are created by layering and burning traditional Korean silk fabrics with a soldering iron, melting the shredded silk into foam board on canvas. A rare early work is also included in the exhibition, demonstrating the artist’s traditional painting background and incorporating Korean and Japanese cultural and folkloric references.

Born in South Korea, Hyon Gyon holds a bachelor’s degree in painting from Mokwon University, South Korea, and both a master’s degree and doctoral degree in painting from Kyoto City University of Arts, Japan. Hyon Gyon’s work has been exhibited internationally at institutions including Parasol Unit, London; Brooklyn Museum, New York; Museum of Kyoto, Japan; Asian Art Museum, San Francisco; and Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo and is included in many public and private collections such as Takahashi Collection, Japan; Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation, Los Angeles; and High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia. Hyon Gyon had a solo exhibition in 2017 at Ben Brown Fine Arts Hong Kong.

Lucy Liu

Liu’s mixed media installation, Seventy Two, is comprised of seventy-two calligraphic ink paintings inspired by ancient Jewish mysticism and Eastern philosophy and is accompanied by a book of texts relating to each component. Liu explores spirituality, religion and identity through the lense of both Eastern and Western experience in her paintings, photographs, collages and installations. Liu holds a bachelor’s degree in Asian Languages and Culture from the University of Michigan, studied photography at Beijing Normal University and studied painting at the New York Studio School. Liu’s work was recently included in a group exhibition at the National Museum of Singapore and is included in many prominent public and private collections. Liu currently lives in New York.

FOR FURTHER PRESS INFORMATION AND ENQUIRIES PLEASE CONTACT:

Juliana Chan Find us @benbrownfinearts

Ben Brown Fine Arts Hong Kong #benbrownfinearts #elementsoftranscendence

T. +852 2522 9600

E. juliana@benbrownfinearts.com www.benbrownfinearts.com

Printmaking exhibition palo alto arts center

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Vermillion 3, monotype,  ink on paper,  48.125 x 35.625 in, 2014. printed with Smith Anderson Editions.  Part of  Local Editions: A Celebration of Bay Area Printmaking at Palo Alto Art Center

Exhibition dates: June 15—August 25, 2019  Featuring:

Darren Almond

Mamma Andersson and Jockum Nordström

Miya Ando

Kathy Aoki

Tauba Auerbach

Sandow Birk

Rebecca Bollinger

Enrique Chagoya

Robert Crumb

Marcel Dzama

Stella Ebner

David Gilhooly

Takuji Hamanaka

Frank Lobdell

Diogenes Lucero

Fred Martin

Michael Mazur

Kerry James Marshall

Greg Niemeyer and Roger Antonsen

Deborah Oropallo

Mel Ramos

Gustavo Rivera

Maurice Sendak

William Wiley

Joe Zirker

The San Francisco Bay Area is home to some of the most creative and innovative print studios in the country. Locally and internationally renowned artists have created new work with master printers at presses which include Arion Press, Crown Point Press, Electric Works, Gallery 16, KALA, Magnolia Editions, Mullowney Printing, Paulson Fontaine Press, Trillium Graphics, and Smith Andersen Editions. For this exhibition, the Art Center has collected pieces produced at these notable presses in order to celebrate the rich tradition of fine art printmaking, showcasing its many processes and results. With our accompanying artist-in-residence program highlighting local printmakers for short, nine-day residencies, the Center intends to engage the public directly in the power of printmaking. And through our Summer of Printmaking, inspire our visitors to try their hand at this dynamic and always-evolving form of expression.

“ELEMENTS OF TRANSCENDENCE​“ ben Brown fine arts hong kong

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Elements of Transcendence

Ben Brown Fine Arts Hong Kong

15 June – 31 August 2019

OPENING BRUNCH: Saturday, 15 June, 11am-3pm

Ben Brown Fine Arts is thrilled to present a summer group exhibition, Elements of Transcendence, at the Hong Kong gallery. The exhibition brings together the work of four artists who explore spirituality through their artwork, employing various artistic techniques and practices, historical and autobiographical references, and imagery and symbolism ranging from abstraction to realism. The output of these four international artists, Miya Ando, Kitty Chou, Hyon Gyon and Lucy Liu, is informed by both Eastern and Western influences and experiences, resulting in a poignant and provocative conversation within the gallery walls.

Miya Ando

Ando explores the transformation of metals, wood and glass through varying techniques, from burnishing and charring to intermingling with elements such as silver nitrate, resin, gold and mica, producing subtle gradations of color and texture that suggest changing atmospheric conditions in nature. There is a duality to her wall pieces and sculptures – the foundation of metal and wood suggest permanence and solidity, while their altered surfaces are infused with the artist’s spiritual investigations and create a meditation on the ephemerality of the natural world.

Ando has had recent solo exhibitions at The Noguchi Museum, New York, and Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, Georgia, and her work is included in numerous public and private collections including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, Detroit Institute of Arts Museum, Detroit, Michigan; and Luft Museum, Amberg, Germany. Ando is a descendant of Bizen swordsmiths and spent part of her childhood among Buddhist priests at a temple in Okayama, Japan. Ando holds a bachelor’s degree in East Asian Studies from the University of California, Berkeley, studied East Asian Studies at Yale University and Stanford University, and apprenticed with a Master Metalsmith at Hattori Studio, Japan.

Kitty Chou

Chou’s enigmatic photographs are rooted in familiar subject matter– trees, doorways, bodies of water – yet through her lense they are transformed into the extraordinary, resulting in semi-abstract, ethereal, optical compositions that challenge perceptions of reality. Chou selected the three works in the exhibition as embodiments of her notions of Buddhist philosophy. Chou photographs her subjects with a simple digital camera and abstains from any form of staging in her creative process. Her images are the product of chance encounter, careful composition and captured moment.

Born and raised in Hong Kong, Kitty Chou holds bachelor’s degrees from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and the New York School of Interior Design. Her photographs have been exhibited in Hong Kong, London, Malta, New York, Paris and Taiwan. In 2013 and 2016 Chou was nominated for the Prix Pictet prize. Chou has had two solo exhibitions at Ben Brown Fine Arts Hong Kong and one solo exhibition at Ben Brown Fine Arts London.

Hyon Gyon

Hyon Gyon addresses highly charged and personal themes, such as shamanism, grief, catharsis, stigma, cultural identity and sexual politics, through her paintings, sculpture, installations and performances. The exhibition includes several portraits and still- lifes that are created by layering and burning traditional Korean silk fabrics with a soldering iron, melting the shredded silk into foam board on canvas. A rare early work is also included in the exhibition, demonstrating the artist’s traditional painting background and incorporating Korean and Japanese cultural and folkloric references.

Born in South Korea, Hyon Gyon holds a bachelor’s degree in painting from Mokwon University, South Korea, and both a master’s degree and doctoral degree in painting from Kyoto City University of Arts, Japan. Hyon Gyon’s work has been exhibited internationally at institutions including Parasol Unit, London; Brooklyn Museum, New York; Museum of Kyoto, Japan; Asian Art Museum, San Francisco; and Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo and is included in many public and private collections such as Takahashi Collection, Japan; Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation, Los Angeles; and High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia. Hyon Gyon had a solo exhibition in 2017 at Ben Brown Fine Arts Hong Kong.

Lucy Liu

Liu’s mixed media installation, Seventy Two, is comprised of seventy-two calligraphic ink paintings inspired by ancient Jewish mysticism and Eastern philosophy and is accompanied by a book of texts relating to each component. Liu explores spirituality, religion and identity through the lense of both Eastern and Western experience in her paintings, photographs, collages and installations. Liu holds a bachelor’s degree in Asian Languages and Culture from the University of Michigan, studied photography at Beijing Normal University and studied painting at the New York Studio School. Liu’s work was recently included in a group exhibition at the National Museum of Singapore and is included in many prominent public and private collections. Liu currently lives in New York.

FOR FURTHER PRESS INFORMATION AND ENQUIRIES PLEASE CONTACT:

Juliana Chan Find us @benbrownfinearts

Ben Brown Fine Arts Hong Kong #benbrownfinearts #elementsoftranscendence

T. +852 2522 9600

E. juliana@benbrownfinearts.com www.benbrownfinearts.com

Large-Scale Commission for Socrates Sculpture Park On view through September 3 2019, exhibition "Chronos Cosmos"

Miya Ando

銀河 Ginga (Silver River), 2019

Steel and fabric

10 x 3.5 x 200 feet

for “Chronos Cosmos” Exhibition

Meandering through the park, Ando’s textile banner Ginga (Silver River) embodies the Japanese word for galaxy, reflecting the relationship between the natural and human imagined ordering of the world. The piece connects two phenomena associated with time: the flowing water of a river and the movement of the stars. Ginga also suggests the myth that inspires the Japanese summer Star Festival, Tanabata.  In the legend, the Sky King, is angered by his daughter, the Weaver Princess, neglecting her weaving while distracted by her beau, the Cow Herder. In reaction, the Sky King separates the lovers, putting the Silver River (the Milky Way) between them.  The rainy season’s storms signify her tears. The sympathetic magpies build a bridge across the sky allowing the lovers (represented by the stars Vega and Altair) to reunite once a year. This day on the 7th day of the 7th month is known throughout Japan as the day wishes come true. The festival marks this meeting, and Ando’s shimmering textile celebrates this celestial journey and tracking of seasons.- Jessica Wilcox, Director of Exhibitions, Socrates Sculpture Park, NYC



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"Clouds" Exhibition on view Kantor Gallery Los Angeles

CURRENT EXHIBITION: KANTOR GALLERY LOS ANGELES

On View April 10 - May 10, 2019

Please contact: info@kantorgallery.com

www.kantorgallery.com

The "Kumo" (Clouds) series are works that investigate an individual's relationship to time.  By employing a vocabulary of clouds, an examination of transitoriness and an awareness to the present moment occurs. The works are created on a metal surface that captures and displays this material’s unique fleeting quality of light.  This series of works has been inspired by a concept that is based in Buddhism, as well as in quantum physics: the fundamental nature of reality is that all constituent forms that make up the universe are temporary.

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"Kumo (Cloud) Tondo 4.3", ink on aluminum composite, 47.5 inches, 2019

"Kumo (Cloud) Tondo 4.3", ink on aluminum composite, 47.5 inches, 2019

EXTENDED: "SORA VERSAILLES" INSTALLATION COMMISSIONED BY FAENA ART

EXTENDED: "SORA VERSAILLES" INSTALLATION COMMISSIONED BY FAENA ART

“Sora Versailles”, 133 x103 ft, printed mesh

3425 COLLINS AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH

This large-scale installation examines perception, as the historic Versailles Building is transformed into the sky itself, becoming void-like or transparent. The installation investigates one’s relationship to time as sunset and sunrise are depicted on the four sides of the building.

The Japanese kanji  is pronounced “Sora” and means sky or heaven. This word also has another reading, pronounced “kū” and means “emptiness or void”. Void is one of the five elements (earth, water, fire, wind, void). “Sora Versailles” installation is inspired by the idea of both sky and emptiness. In Buddhism as well as in Quantum Physics, the fundamental nature of reality is that all constituent forms that make up the universe are temporary, a concept termed ‘Sunyata.’ Artist Miya Ando pays homage to the  building’s original architect Roy France’s design philosophy of “let in the air and sun” as she wraps one of Miami’s most iconic buildings in clouds.

“Wrapping the historic Versailles Building with cloud imagery is an investigation into the idea that the fundamental nature of reality is that all constituent forms that create the universe are temporary, an underlying principle of both Buddhism as well as quantum physics."- Miya Ando

Photo: Kerry McLaney

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UPCOMING: SOLO EXHIBITION THE CORNELL MUSEUM OF ART

Exhibition Title: “Waves Becoming Light”

April 25 - October 6, 2019

Miya Ando creates an immersive environment for her solo exhibition at The Cornell Museum of Art. Included  is a large-scale, diaphanous installation of suspended silk fabric inspired by a quote by Zen Monk Eisei Dõgen “[Being illuminated by] the moon dwelling in the quiet mind, even the waves are breaking down and becoming light.”  She will also be exhibiting three paintings, “New Moon” and “Full Moon” (23k gold, pigment, mica, resin, stainless steel) and “Sui Getsu” (Water Moon), ink on aluminum composite.

"Sui Getsu (Water Moon)" 48 x 60 inches, ink on aluminum, 2019

"Sui Getsu (Water Moon)" 48 x 60 inches, ink on aluminum, 2019

"Full Moon", 24 k gold, pigment, urethane, resin, stainless steel, 47.5 inches, 2019

"Full Moon", 24 k gold, pigment, urethane, resin, stainless steel, 47.5 inches, 2019

"New Moon", 24 k gold, pigment, urethane, resin, stainless steel, 47.5 inches, 2019

"New Moon", 24 k gold, pigment, urethane, resin, stainless steel, 47.5 inches, 2019

NEW COMMISSION Large-scale commission: Socrates Sculpture Park, NY for exhibition "Chronos Cosmos" 200 foot long outdoor installation "Ginga" (The Silver River) May 5 - September 3 2019

NEW COMMISSION


Large-scale commission: Socrates Sculpture Park, NY for exhibition "Chronos Cosmos"

200 foot long outdoor installation "Ginga" (The Silver River)

May 5 - September 3 2019


Miya Ando

銀河 Ginga (Silver River), 2019

Steel and fabric

10 x 3.5 x 200 feet

Meandering through the park, Ando’s textile banner Ginga (Silver River) embodies the Japanese word for galaxy, reflecting the relationship between the natural and human imagined ordering of the world. The piece connects two phenomena associated with time: the flowing water of a river and the movement of the stars. Ginga also suggests the myth that inspires the Japanese summer Star Festival, Tanabata.  In the legend, the Sky King, is angered by his daughter, the Weaver Princess, neglecting her weaving while distracted by her beau, the Cow Herder. In reaction, the Sky King separates the lovers, putting the Silver River (the Milky Way) between them.  The rainy season’s storms signify her tears. The sympathetic magpies build a bridge across the sky allowing the lovers (represented by the stars Vega and Altair) to reunite once a year. This day on the 7th day of the 7th month is known throughout Japan as the day wishes come true. The festival marks this meeting, and Ando’s shimmering textile celebrates this celestial journey and tracking of seasons.- Jessica Wilcox, Director of Exhibitions Socrates Sculpture Park


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“SORA VERSAILLES” on view now in Miami for Faena Festival

“Sora Versailles”, 133 x103 ft, printed mesh

VERSAILLES HOTEL

3425 COLLINS AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH

Commissioned by Faena Art

This large-scale installation examines perception, as the historic Versailles Building is transformed into the sky itself, becoming void-like or transparent. The installation investigates one’s relationship to time as sunset and sunrise are depicted on the four sides of the building.

The Japanese kanji   is pronounced “Sora” and means sky or heaven. This word also has another reading, pronounced “kū” and means “emptiness or void”. Void is one of the five elements (earth, water, fire, wind, void). “Sora Versailles” installation is inspired by the idea of both sky and emptiness. In Buddhism as well as in Quantum Physics, the fundamental nature of reality is that all constituent forms that make up the universe are temporary, a concept termed ‘Sunyata.’ Artist Miya Ando pays homage to the  building’s original architect Roy France’s design philosophy of  “let in the air and sun” as she wraps one of  Miami’s most iconic buildings in clouds.

#faenafestival

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Photo: Kerry McLaney

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SPARTANBURG ART MUSEUM “IN THEIR ELEMENT” ON VIEW NOW


11.15.2018 - 02.10.2019

Humans have used symbols of earth, fire, water, and air for millennia, using them as metaphors to communicate universal ideals and truths about the world in which we live. This exhibition dives into a variety of contemporary practices that continue to express our awe, reverence, and dependence on two of the four Aristotelian elements, in unexpected and dynamic ways.

pictured: “Obon” (The returning of the spirits) Bodhi (Ficus Religiosa) leaves, phosphorescence, resin.

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JEAN PAUL NAJAR FOUNDATION MUSEUM ACQUISITION AND EXHIBITION

JEAN-PAUL NAJAR FOUNDATION

a contemporary art museum

The Monochrome Revisited

October 23, 2018 – February 28, 2019

United Arab Emirates, DUBAI – The monochrome is considered to be one of the most accomplished forms of painting. The importance of the monochrome lies in its conception, in its artistic and philosophical principles, and for some, in its ability to address social concerns. Kazimir Malevich’s Black Square (1915) is considered to be the first monochrome in the history of art. But can the origin of the monochrome be situated prior to the early twentieth- century?

The Jean-Paul Najar Foundation (JPNF) presents The Monochrome Revisited, an exhibition that explores the history and evolution of the monochrome. The exhibition is divided into three parts: the first section focuses on the ‘first monochromes’ found in printed matter from the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries, putting into question its genesis; the second section takes its inspiration from Marcia Hafif’s seminal text Beginning Again, illustrating her purpose with selected works; and the final part of the exhibition looks at how artists today continue to be preoccupied with the monochrome, engaging with it in their practice to explore contemporary issues.

In late 2015, an announcement was made at the State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow that incited controversy. Art historians at the national museum had discovered, under Kazimir Malevich’s iconic composition Black Square (1915) a scrawled reference to a provocative work sardonically titled Negroes Fight in a Tunnel by poet Paul Bilhaud. First exhibited in 1882 at Les Arts Incohérents, Bilhaud’s politically incorrect work (today considered to be the first documented monochrome) intended to simultaneously ridicule modernism as it acknowledged its radicalness. Fifteen years later, in 1897 Alphonse Allais published Album primo-avrilesque, which featured a number of works including Paul Bilhaud appropriated black monochrome. This section of the exhibition looks at this publication as well as others including Robert Fludd’s (first published in 1617) masterwork Utriusque cosmi maioris scilicet et minoris metaphysica, physica atque technica historia (The Metaphysical, Physical and Technical History of the Two

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The second part of the exhibition takes as its core Marcia Hafif’s influential essay Beginning Again, published in Artforum in 1978. Throughout her fifty-year artistic career, Hafif, sought to push against any notion that “the enterprise of painting”1 had come to an end. She writes, “It was necessary to turn inward to the means of art, the materials and techniques with which art is made. Artists still interested in painting began an analysis – or destruction – of painting, turning to the basic question of what painting is.”2 We pay homage to Hafif and the important artists she references in her text exploring not only their use of material and technique but the contemplative attributes they bestow onto the monochrome. Artists include James Bishop, Dale Henry, Ralph Humphrey, Douglas Sanderson, Lucio Pozzi, and Susanna Tanger. The exhibition then looks at how these artists elaborated and expounded on the art form, giving a deeper understanding of monochrome painting.

Finally, we look at how contemporary artists today engage with the monochrome. Working across various mediums including painting, photography, and the ready-made, the monochrome has once again undergone an evolution, as artists redefine what it is and what it can be. Contemporary artists such as Miya Ando, David Batchelor, Alteronce Gumby, Alfredo Jaar, Mohammad Kazem, and Hassan Sharif demonstrate the vitally important role the monochrome continues to play in contemporary art. A provocative and innovative art form to this day, the monochrome retains the power to address contemporary issues, challenging our perception of the world we live in.

The Monochrome Revisited is on view at the Jean-Paul Najar Foundation in Dubai through February 28, 2019.

The Jean-Paul Najar Foundation gratefully acknowledges the support of all the artists, individuals and organizations that have made this exhibition possible. Special thanks to Alanna Heiss, The Dale Henry Estate, David Batchelor, Alteronce Gumby, the Estate of Hassan Sharif, Alfredo Jaar Studios, Mohammed Kazem, Gallery Isabelle van den Eynde and Lily Wei.

Full List of Artists (in alphabetical order):

Miya Ando, David Batchelor, James Bishop, Alteronce Gumby, Marcia Hafif, Dale Henry, Ralph Humphrey, Alfredo Jaar, Mohammad Kazem, Lucio Pozzi, Douglas Sanderson, Hassan Sharif, and Susanna Tanger.

About the JPNF

The Jean-Paul Najar Foundation for Contemporary Art is a non-profit ICOM registered private museum, gathering abstract European and American art from the 1960s through today. The JPNF is also home to a remarkable archive tracing forty years of artist-collector exchanges. Education is central to the museum’s mission. We are committed to presenting an educational program that promotes a spirit of discovery and inquiry that engages our diverse communities. The JPNF is designed by Mario Jossa, of Marcel Breuer and Associates, and is presented in partnership with Alserkal Avenue in Dubai.

For further information or images, please contact Wafa Jadallah on T +97142587078 or wafa@jpnajarfoundation.com Link to Marcia Hafif’s Essay ‘Beginning Again’

www.jpnajarfoundation.com | @JPNFMUSEUM JPNF is open Sunday – Saturday, 11AM – 6PM

“Hamon” (The Cloudlike Pattern on the Edge of a Sword), 40x40 in, pigment, urethane, aluminum, 2016

“Hamon” (The Cloudlike Pattern on the Edge of a Sword), 40x40 in, pigment, urethane, aluminum, 2016